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THANKSGIVING IS HERE, LET’S TALK TURKEY!

Dinner2 THANKSGIVING IS HERE, LET’S TALK TURKEY!

AVOID VETERINARY VISITS,

ESPECIALLY DURING the HOLIDAYS!

While we are planning and preparing all of our Thanksgiving dishes, we need to be aware of the foods that our dog or cat may ‘accidentally’ find on the floor.

YES, I AM TALKING TO YOU!

As much as our pets want to hang out in the kitchen, in the hopes of drops and spills, it’s best to keep them elsewhere.  We realize they are just ‘trying to help’ but we don’t need our gathering and delicious meal to be interrupted, due to an emergency vet visit, not to mention our mental anguish or the cost of the trip.

Veterinary appointments triple, over the holidays,

mostly because of pet owners sharing their food.

 

KEEP OUR PLATES TO OURSELVES! 

Plate Full 150x150 THANKSGIVING IS HERE, LET’S TALK TURKEY!

It’s okay to be selfish with Thanksgiving food/treats! 

 

TURKEY – A small amount of the turkey breast is okay but it has much more fat than chicken and should be given in moderation.  Completely avoid letting them ingest turkey skin.  Not only does it contain the most fat, the spices used to flavor the turkey could be harmful, especially sage.  Bones can easily break, splinter and may get stuck in pets’ throats or stomachs.Sliced Turkey and Sides 150x150 THANKSGIVING IS HERE, LET’S TALK TURKEY!

SAGE is TOXIC

DRESSING– A taste of plain dressing is okay.  Onions are a 100% NO, NO.  Raw, cooked, dehydrated or powdered, all onions are unsafe.  Our pets should dodge all spices, which includes garlic.  Garlic can cause red blood cells to break down, weight loss, anemia and lethargy.

 

FATTY FOODS can cause the PANCREAS to become INFLAMED

 

VEGETABLES– Beans, Carrots and Broccoli are healthy treats, especially if they’re steamed.  (Beans are full of vitamins, minerals and fiber.  Carrots not only have vitamins, fiber and potassium but raw, baby carrots are good for dental.)

No toppings, nuts or casseroles, please.  Many casseroles contain eggs.  Drips of raw eggs can contain salmonella or E Coli.

Dinner1 150x150 THANKSGIVING IS HERE, LET’S TALK TURKEY!

ONIONS are POISONOUS

POTATOES – Sliced, baked or mashed, potatoes are good for pets but we should keep the skin, butter, sauce, cream and gravy on the human plates.

SWEET POTATOES – These potatoes are healthier, for us and our pets.  They contain fiber, vitamins and carotene but the butter, sugar and marshmallows are not healthy.  Nutmeg is a toxic spice.

CORN – A few kernels are an acceptable snack.  The carbs have a tendency to give your pet energy.

PUMPKIN– Pumpkin is a healthy treat but only if it is plain.  Fresh or canned (sugar free) pumpkin is filled with vitamins, fiber and beta carotene.  (Keep a can on hand.  It’s also good for upset stomachs and GI tract problems.)  Consider Pumpkin Pie as off limits, since sugar, spices, especially nutmegpumpkin pie 150x150 THANKSGIVING IS HERE, LET’S TALK TURKEY! are bad for our furry friends.  Nuts are not advisable, either.

AVOID all SUGARS and SPICES, especially NUTMEG 

 

CRANBERRIES – These are a healthy treat but adding gelatin is questionable.  These berries are full of vitamin C and antioxidants.

NUTS – They can cause vomiting, lethargy, muscle and joint pain and swelling.  Veterinarians say that walnuts and macadamia nuts should be completely evaded.  Fresh, sugar-free peanut butter is okay.

CHOCOLATE –Pets should not get any chocolate or chocolate pecan pie.  The darker the chocolate makes it worse for our companions.

APPLES – Raw or dehydrated apples are a healthy snack but avoid apple pie, due to sugars and spices.Pies 150x150 THANKSGIVING IS HERE, LET’S TALK TURKEY!

GRAPES and RAISINS can cause PERMANENT KIDNEY DAMAGE

We all love our pets and yet some of us are insistent upon sharing bits, tastes and nibbles.  

IS THIS YOU? MAKE SURE TO KEEP THE TREATS TO A MINIMUM

 

Here are the SAFEST Thanksgiving foods, for your pet…

 

Turkey breast meat. (No Skin)

Plain, raw or steamed vegetables, as well as fresh, raw or dehydrated cranberries and apples.  (Plain, no butter, spices, casseroles or soufflé)

Plain, cooked potatoes, sweet potatoes and pumpkin, along with a few kernels of corn. (No seasonings, butter, spices or other toppings.)

Consider you’re pets’ intestinal tracts.  If they are not used to these foods, make sure to minimize it or completely eliminate it.

 

Happy Thanksgiving to You and Your Pets!  

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